Nice Design Makes Me Hungry

santini.jpg

Gorgeous packaging design by Henry Luong. Some people commented on the Dieline site that they don’t like the broken text. Personally I love it and I think it makes the design more interesting.

Via Dieline        

14 Comments on "Nice Design Makes Me Hungry"

  • Joey says

    I like it a lot, too. The nutrition facts have never looked better.

  • Jesse says

    I’m just as minimalist as the next guy, but personally, broken text is a pretty careless use of typography. Our goal as designers should be to communicate, and this is just irritating, it’s practically impossible to understand (let alone it being set in all caps). It looks great, but at too great of a cost, in my opinion.

  • Christian says

    Good point, Jesse. I agree. In some cases it works just fine, but here it seems like its been justified to create a straight column. Looks unbalanced and illegible to me as I almost had to spell it out to be able to read it.

  • bender says

    The broken text is awfully inlegible. And the variable tracking is straight from a graphic design horror show. And why is the last line shorter than the rest and left aligned?
    Nutritional facts look nice though.

  • MP says

    I don’t like the usage of broken text here, but I do like that logo. The all caps works here as well. Very clean.

    -MP

  • Antonio says

    I think some of you are over analyzing this. I agree that the letter-spacing is bad, it seems like he wanted to create a square column instead of left justifying everything, but I think that copy block is meant to be more of a visual element. The important information here is the nutritional facts, if that were broken than it would have failed as a design. At least that’s how I see it.

    Overall this design is a hell of a lot better than what we usually see.

  • Jesse says

    I understand your viewpoint Antonio, but I think it could be a much more powerful piece of work if it was able to communicate its message (it is a form of advertisement) and be visually stunning, which we’ve all seen countless designers accomplish.

  • Antonio says

    You definitely have a valid point Jesse. Maybe he could have given each word a different color making it easier to read. Personally I’m a sucker for broken text.

  • Joey says

    “Maybe he could have given each word a different color making it easier to read.”

    Yes, definitely. Even if it were subtle color differences between alternating words it would have helped a lot.

  • bender says

    Oh it’s a lovely idea. I like broken text as much as the next guy. It’s just that the execution is rather lacking and frankly pretty amateurish.

  • Boson says

    The irony is that for entering this comment my anti-spam word is KERNING.

    This design looks horrible, it’s just a typographic fad that been shoe-horned into the wrong project. The designer has seriously failed in this instance. I wonder if he would like to have a go and working on a logo for 2012 Olympics.

  • Yorit says

    looks nice … communicate horrible. form over content!

  • Antonio says

    Calling the design horrible it an exaggeration. The kernings isn’t really amateurish either since justification is used in books, magazines and newspapers, it’s just not the best option in this situation. The awkward spacing caused by justification is amplified in this design, making it look bad.

    Again, it’s not the greatest design ever created, but the overall design sure beats the hell out of a lot of chip packaging out there. It’s nice to see something new and refreshing.

  • Maria says

    I wish the idea wasn’t taken to this extreme.

    Having the word “crisp” COMPLETE -legible- will make the same point and actually communicate