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Posts Tagged with “publication”

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Dot Zero – Issue 1

Dot Zero Issue 1

Dot Zero Issue 1

Dot Zero Issue 1

Dot Zero was a quar­terly by Uni­mark in part­ner­ship with Finch Paper that focused on the the­ory and prac­tice of visual com­mu­ni­ca­tion. Only five issues were pub­lished between 1966 and 1968, and Mas­simo Vignelli was the designer and cre­ative direc­tor of the mag­a­zine. Vignelli wanted to make the design excit­ing, but sim­ple, so he set all type in only two weights of Hel­vetica and every­thing printed in black and white.

Michael Bierut inter­viewed Vignelli about the mag­a­zine. Some nice insights on how the pub­li­ca­tion came about, and its production.

The folks at Ratio­nale Design have made avail­able a hi-res PDF of issue 1 of Dot Zero, and you can see some pho­tos of issue 2 here.

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MADE Quarterly Edition Two

Made Edition Two

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Edi­tion Two of the per­fectly designed MADE is now avail­able. MADE Quar­terly is a pub­li­ca­tion that doc­u­ments the work­ings of the mod­ern maker, includ­ing but not lim­ited to indus­trial design, archi­tec­ture, fash­ion, inte­rior design, pho­tog­ra­phy and the culi­nary world.

The sec­ond edi­tion of MADE Quar­terly fea­tures: Mast Broth­ers (USA), Best Made Co (USA), Huet Broth­ers (NLD), Ste­vie Gee (GBR), Earth Tu Face (USA), March Stu­dio (AUS), Uni­form Wares (GBR), Henry Wil­son (AUS), Ben Huff (USA) and Min­i­malux (GBR). MADE Edi­tion Two also fea­tures four indi­vid­ual cov­ers, each dis­play­ing cho­sen works from our esteemed con­trib­u­tors. Please note cov­ers are dis­trib­uted randomly.

Great design and content.

Roseta y Oihana

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Roseta y Oihana is a Barcelona based design agency founder by Roseta Mus Pons and Oihana Her­rera Erneta. I absolutely love the iden­tity and pub­li­ca­tion design they did for the MCP’s (Com­mon­wealth of the Pam­plona) Envi­ron­men­tal Edu­ca­tion Program.

Typographische Monatsblätter Research Archive

Typographische Monatsblatter Research Archive

Pre­pare to spend the rest of your day on this site. TM Research Archive is an incred­i­ble web­site that cat­a­logs cover designs of the influ­en­cial jour­nal, Typographis­che Monats­blät­ter. The site focuses on the issues from 1960 to 1990, the period that had the most influ­ence on mod­ern typog­ra­phy, and it fea­tures inter­views with design­ers that have con­tributed to the pub­li­ca­tion over the years, as well infor­ma­tion on the designer and type­face used for each issue.

The site was cre­ated by Louise Par­adis as part of her Mas­ter degree in Art Direc­tion at the ECAL/University of Art and Design Lau­sanne, Switzer­land. The project con­tin­ued with the finan­cial sup­port from ECAL and the Uni­ver­sity of Applied Sci­ences and Arts West­ern Switzerland.

All of the issues pho­tographed were from the pri­vate col­lec­tion of Jean-Pierre Graber, the chief edi­tor of TM for over twenty years.

The site gives you a great sense of how the design evolved over the decades. My per­sonal favorites are the cov­ers designed by Yves Zim­mer­mann, Emil Ruder, Robert Büch­ler and Felix Berman.

What an amaz­ing resource to have avail­able to design­ers. Thank you Louise.

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Bracket Vol. 02: Hunger

Bracket Vol. 2: Hunger

Bracket is a new pub­li­ca­tion that fea­tures every­thing in between. Ideas, voices and processes that are over­looked and under– appre­ci­ated. The col­lec­tion fea­tures 8 vol­umes to be pub­lished from now until 2012 on top­ics from Craft, Hunger, Ethics to Spirit and Fail­ure. The beau­ti­ful newsprint was designed by Felix Ng of Anony­mous.

Issue 2 was just released and it’s on the topic of Hunger and fea­tures Seth Godin, John Maeda, HelloVon, Behance, This is Real Art, Ghostly Inter­na­tional, Tim­o­thy Sac­centi and more.

Loose Leaf Edition 01

Loose Leaf Edition 1

Loose Leaf is a new pub­li­ca­tion by Man­ual that fea­tures large-format printed art works. What’s unique about it is that each edi­tion comes pack­aged ready to be installed on your wall. The pub­li­ca­tion is unbound and each piece if hole-punched allow­ing you to eas­ily dis­play it on a wall with small push­pins. Pretty neat.

You can find out more or grab a copy on the site.

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Studio Beige

studio beige olaf mooij

Here’s a really nice mono­graph of artist Olaf Mooij by Stu­dio Beige.

Size: 31.5 x 23 cm
Pages: 152 pages + 8 pages cover
Cover: Off­set Print, Printed on 300 g/m2 Munken Lynx in FC+2 PMS col­ors, Blind Emboss­ing
Inside book: 130 g/m2 Munken lynx for textpages (2 pms) and draw­ings, 150 g/m2 GoMatt for images
Bind­ing: Per­fect Otobind

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Les Mason: Epicurean Magazine 1966–1979

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This is a stun­ning lim­ited edi­tion pub­li­ca­tion designed by Aus­tralian designer, Dominic Hof­st­ede. The book­let fea­tures cov­ers and spreads of Epi­curean Mag­a­zine designed by Art Direc­tor Les Mason.

Hof­st­ede cre­ated a sim­ple and ele­gant lay­out for the book, and the light tan pages with orange text is superb. You can see more images at Rec­ol­lec­tion or pick up a copy at The Narrows.

Page Magazine

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I’ve never heard Page Mag­a­zine before, but I stum­bled upon on it and it’s mes­mer­ized by its won­der­ful design. Most mag­a­zines today are a chaotic mess of adver­tise­ments and poorly designed arti­cles, all bat­tling each other for promi­nence. It’s refresh­ing to see such a sim­ple and beau­ti­ful approach.

The mag­a­zine seems to be designed by Mex­i­can agency, Face. There are a bunch of detailed pho­tos of the mag at this Behance gallery.

Process Journal: Edition Three

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I just received Edi­tion Three of the excel­lent design pub­li­ca­tion Process Jour­nal. It fea­tures work from Bib­lio­theque, Stu­dio New­work, Andrew Zuck­er­man, Made­Thought, North, Stock­holm Design Lab, Büro North and more. As well as arti­cles by Tom Crab­tree (Man­ual) and War­ren Tay­lor (The Narrows).

This jour­nal is exquis­ite. The qual­ity of the pro­duc­tion and design is superb and the pub­li­ca­tion is an exam­ple of why print should never die. The cover alone is to die for: Two color cover with deboss­ing and printed on Knight Cream 350GSM Cover stock.

Max Lamb Booklet

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Pen­ta­gram cre­ated this won­der­ful book­let that cel­e­brates the com­ple­tion of a spe­cial piece by designer Max Lamb. I love the spreads in which the images span across both pages.

Process Journal: The Grid

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Thomas Williams, one of the tal­ents behind the excel­lent Process Jour­nal, has doc­u­mented the changes that were made to the grid sys­tem for Edi­tion Two of the jour­nal. Thomas writes:

The Process Jour­nal grid has under­gone sev­eral updates for Edi­tion Two, the major change being an increase in the size of the inter­nal gut­ter from 30mm up to 40mm. Although this may appear to be only a minor adjust­ment, it changes the dynam­ics of the grid in sev­eral dif­fer­ent ways.

The extra 10mm was taken from the out­side columns, oth­er­wise reserved for image cap­tions and room for the reader’s thumbs to hold the pub­li­ca­tion (with min­i­mal over­lay of the con­tent). The space was removed evenly from these columns to min­i­mize the change in visual con­sis­tency from the pre­vi­ous edition.

Increas­ing this gut­ter also proved to be advan­ta­geous to the over­all lay­out of the pub­li­ca­tion and resulted in three out­comes: firstly, by cen­tral­iz­ing the con­tent fur­ther into the mid­dle of the page allow­ing more padding and eas­ier read­ing of type that falls within the two cen­tral columns; sec­ondly, it allows a larger clear­ance for images placed over or near the edge of the gut­ter — thus min­i­miz­ing the loss of image into the spine; and lastly, the increase results in an over­all wider area of content.

The orig­i­nal objec­tive was to cre­ate a grid that was flex­i­ble enough to deal with a wide range of con­tent, enable flex­i­bil­ity and retain visual con­sis­tency. This objec­tive still remains; hence the vast major­ity of grid has been unal­tered and has proven itself wor­thy for a sec­ond time. In our expe­ri­ence it is a rare to have the chance to revisit and refine a project so we have embraced the oppor­tu­nity and believe that small changes like these con­tribute to our endeavor of pro­duc­ing an always-improving publication.